Rob Zombie and mid-century TV's The Munsters will soon come together onscreen, as the 3 From Hell auteur and musician has landed yet another classic entertainment property on which to put his unique stamp as a filmmaker. And the project's rumored to be a part of NBCUniversal's new streaming service, Peacock.

According to Bloody Disgusting, the gossip on Monday (April 19) was that the solo artist and former White Zombie bandleader — also known to horror movie devotees for his Firefly Trilogy (House of 1000 Corpses and The Devil's Rejects along with 3 From Hell), among other scary flicks — would most likely make The Munsters as a Peacock exclusive to premiere on streaming and in theaters at the same time.

But the fact that Zombie is rebooting The Munsters in the first place is evidently not a rumor — it's only the avenue by which it will emerge that's fueling speculation. The initial news of Zombie's attachment to the sitcom franchise first came up last month.

"Production on the film is currently set to begin in Budapest in early May," Murphy's Universe reported in March. "Two of Zombie's usual suspects have been cast as leads in the comedy, with Jeff Daniel Phillips set as Herman Munster and Zombie's wife, Sheri Moon Zombie, set as Lily Munster."

The cast of Zombie's Munsters will also reportedly include Dan Roebuck, Jorge Garcia and Richard Brake. Not to mention, Cassandra Peterson, known to horror buffs as Elvira, Mistress of the Dark, will also play a supporting role.

Fans of Zombie's films — many of which feature intense horror scenes — might be interested to see how the director molds the family-friendly '60s TV series about a monster family into the type of retelling he'd call his own. After all, the filmmaker has a pretty specific vision for the movies he crafts. In 2007, he rebooted Halloween (later doing the same with Halloween II) in a way that only the "Dragula" singer could.

"I think for the most part, with most horror movies, it's the weird ones that seem to stick with people," Zombie told Loudwire in 2018. "It's not the blockbusters that did $100 million that was everywhere, that everybody loved. Sometimes those just get forgotten. It's kind of the weird movies that really hit the fanbase. Like Evil Dead — that wasn't a blockbuster that did $100 million. It's a movie most people, at the time, had never even heard of. Those are the ones that stick around."

Let's see how weird his Munsters ends up.

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